Snoqualmie Tribe Environmental & Natural Resources Department

Important Updates from ENR

 

Below are a few updates and quick information that we believe are important for the Snoqualmie Tribal Membership and the public to know.

Upper Snoqualmie River Resilient Corridor Management Plan

Increasing Connectivity with the Snoqualmie River

A resilient Snoqualmie River for all means more active management of the Upper Valley. A responsible planning approach is needed to respond to the constantly changing river environment.

The Snoqualmie Tribe’s relationship with the river valley is a generational commitment that has existed since time immemorial. The Tribe is recommending actions to increase access to a clean river for all.

The Snoqualmie Tribe is studying the river ecology and landscape processes in the Upper Snoqualmie Corridor and developed a plan to share how conditions are expected to change in a warming climate. The Upper Snoqualmie Resilient River Corridor Management Plan is now available detailing the existing conditions, climate change projections, and 22 actions to increase the connectivity of the river.

The plan will serve as a knowledge source and discussion tool to support a richer cultural relationship with the Upper Snoqualmie River and promote a collective understanding of a resilient river for all.

 

Walking Tour of the Snoqualmie River

Take a look at the 22 actions recommended by the Snoqualmie Tribe, and we invite you to visit the river! We invite community members to use this walking tour guide and walk along the study area of the resilient river corridor management plan, enjoy the views, and learn more about the actions in the plan recommended by the Snoqualmie Tribe.

Kokanee Salmon Return Update - Nov. 2021

After extensive restoration work on Zackuse Creek by the Snoqualmie Tribe and other local governments and organizations, kokanee salmon have been spotted in the creek for the first time in roughly 40 years! It’s exciting to see these “little red fish” returning to their native spawning grounds after so many years!

As of November 15, the Snoqualmie Tribe’s Environmental & Natural Resources Department and other local organizations have observed 45 kokanee salmon in Zackuse Creek, though the total could be more. This has been one of the most productive returns that has been observed on Lake Sammamish in the past 5 years. And the return season for the kokanee isn’t over yet!

To see some of the first footage of these kokanee salmon visit the Snoqualmie Tribe’s Facebook Page or watch the following video credited to David Kyle of Trout Unlimited.

To learn more about the partnership that is behind this success, please visit the Lake Sammamish Kokanee Work Group page of the King County website.

Opportunities for Snoqualmie Tribal Membership & Youth

The ENR Department keeps a look out for opportunities that apply to or seek out Snoqualmie Tribal Membership and descendants. These opportunities include volunteer and board member positions that often work towards bettering our community and shared environment in the Pacific Northwest. To find out more, click the link below.

Opportunities for Snoqualmie Tribal Membership & Youth

Probable Coho Urban Runoff Mortality Syndrome Culprit Identified

Here in the Puget Sound we commonly see high mortality in Coho salmon due to stormwater exposure when adults migrate up urban creeks to reproduce. Though there is a large spectrum of urban pollutants, a highly toxic 6PPD quinone product commonly used in tire rubber has now been identified in creeks at toxic levels. This breaking research will hopefully lead to regulation and consumer products that do not contain this toxic chemical as we rely on cars for transportation in our society and cannot escape the fact that tires are an important part of that.

“A ubiquitous tire rubber-derived chemical induces acute mortality in coho salmon”

Z. Tian et al., Science 10.1126/science.abd6951 (2020).

Snoqualmie Indian Tribe celebrates legislative win against Suction Dredge Mining in Washington State

After years of advocating for regulatory reform of suction dredge mining in Washington State’s streams and rivers, the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is celebrating progress in Olympia. Prior to the passing of HB 1261, Washington State regulations on suction dredging were the laxest of many Western states, including Idaho, Oregon, California, and Montana. After many previous attempts, and years of hard work to raise awareness of this outdated and habitat-destroying practice, suction dredge reform finally passed both houses of the Legislature and was signed into law by Governor Inslee on March 18th, 2020. Suction dredge mining will now be banned from 11,000 miles of Washington stream habitat designated as ‘critical’ for salmon and trout, while remaining legal on 61,000 miles of ‘non-critical’ stream habitat.

Suction dredging is a motorized method that mineral prospectors use to search for gold in the bottoms of waterways. Imagine a giant, floating vacuum that sucks up streambed gravels, then spits the tailings back out after sifting for precious metals. Miners say it’s a quick and effective way of covering ground, but the process damages in-stream habitat. Photo courtesy of Kim McDonald; originally published in the Yakima Herald.

COVID-19 & Snoqualmie Tribe ENR Update

The Snoqualmie Tribe ENR Department is currently closed to the public but is still planning and hosting in-person volunteer events for restoration. If you would like to learn more abour ENR volunteer events, please sign up for our ENR Volunteer Email List.

If you need to contact any staff members at the ENR Department, you can find our contact information on the Our Mission page.

ENR Volunteer Email List

 

Want to sign up to receive ENR updates via the ENR Volunteer Email List?

Follow the link in the button to be taken to the ENR Email List form for upcoming updates on the ENR Department, local environmental issues, and volunteering opportunities with ENR.

Upcoming Events

There are no upcoming events.

Zackuse Creek Restoration Volunteer Event

Zackuse Creek – Sammamish, WA

This restoration project site was in direct support of the culvert restoration that occurred on Zackuse Creek into Lake Sammamish, and was attended by nearly 80 volunteers.

Event Date 10/27/2018

Zackuse Creek Restoration Volunteer Event

Zackuse Creek – Sammamish, WA

This restoration project site was in direct support of the culvert restoration that occurred on Zackuse Creek into Lake Sammamish, and was attended by nearly 80 volunteers.

Event Date 10/27/2018

Earth Day 2019 Restoration Volunteer Event

Kimball Creek – Snoqualmie, WA

In partnership with the Mt. Si High School Green Team, Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center, the Society for Ecological Restoration, and Crown Bees.

Event Date 04/20/2019

Earth Day 2019 Restoration Volunteer Event

Kimball Creek – Snoqualmie, WA

In partnership with the Mt. Si High School Green Team, Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center, the Society for Ecological Restoration, and Crown Bees.

Event Date 04/20/2019

Haffner-Barfuse Restoration Volunteer Event

Snoqualmie River – Fall City, WA

The Haffner-Barfuse Floodplain Restoration Project is part of larger salmon recovery floodplain re-connection project in partnership with King County.

The goal of this project is to restore at least 30 acres of past agricultural land to healthy main river floodplain riparian forest. This event was in partnership with the Wilderness Awareness School.

Event Date 02/22/2020

Haffner-Barfuse Restoration Volunteer Event

Snoqualmie River – Fall City, WA

The Haffner-Barfuse Floodplain Restoration Project is part of larger salmon recovery floodplain re-connection project in partnership with King County.

The goal of this project is to restore at least 30 acres of past agricultural land to healthy main river floodplain riparian forest. This event was in partnership with the Wilderness Awareness School.

Event Date 02/22/2020

Need to Contact Us?

 

To contact any of our ENR staff, please click on the button below.

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ENR Updates Blog

 

The ENR Updates Blog is where updates about ENR Department projects will be shared, as well as updates about our local habitats.

 

We are excited to share with you the goals and passions of the ENR Department to create positive relationships with our local environment.

 

“The mission of the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe (SIT) Environmental and Natural Resources (ENR) Department is to protect, preserve and enhance the natural and cultural resources of the Snoqualmie Reservation and traditional tribal lands for the benefit of current and future generations.”

ENR fulfills this mission through habitat restoration and water quality improvement projects, waste reduction and recycling, education through stewardship, and by monitoring the impacts of regional policies and projects.